Park City “Dine About” Happening Now

WHAT:           The Park City Area Restaurant Association (PCARA) welcomes foodies to its fifth annual “Dine About” this fall. The two-week restaurant event features savory two-course lunches and three-course dinners at more than two dozen area dining establishments, all at an incredible value.

PCARA partnered with Stay Park City to offer exclusive lodging packages for guests during Dine About. Thanks to their unique local perspective, Stay Park City provides hand-picked accommodations situated in the heart of historic Park City, tucked in surrounding neighborhoods, and nestled in the mountains at the guaranteed lowest prices. Dine About lodging offers can be booked here.

WHERE:         Foodies can enjoy Dine About at more than 30 participating restaurants:

Baja Cantina

Bistro 412

Brass Tag

Butcher’s Chop House

Café Terigo

Cena Ristorante

Chimayo

Deer Valley Grocery~Café

Escala Provisions Company Restaurant & Bar

Fletcher’s

Grappa

Grub Steak Restaurant

Handle

Lespri Prime Steak Sushi

Park City Marriott – DEN

Park City Marriott – Timbers

Powder at Waldorf Astoria

Purple Sage

Red Rock Junction

Red Tail Grill

Riverhorse on Main

Riverhorse Provisions

Shabu

Silver Star Café

Squatters

Sushi Blue

Trio Café Park City

tupelo

Twisted Fern

Wasatch Brew Pub

Versante Hearth & Bar

Visit parkcityrestaurants.com for full menus.

WHEN:           Sunday, October 1 – Sunday, October 15

PRICE:            Two-Course Lunch: $10 and $15 per person

Three-Course Dinner: $20 or $40 per person

Shoulder Season in Park City

Some people call it shoulder season. Others call it mud season. Park City locals call it “we finally have our town back” season. And Wasatch Front locals call it “get great hotel and restaurant deals, and avoid the crowds” season.

Way back when I was a kid, I remember my family heading up to Park City in the fall. We’d check out the Autumn Aloft, and then head over to Main Street to walk around and absorb the sights and smells of fall in the mountains. Leaves changing colors and crisp air combined to make it a magical time.

Now, even though I’m a little bit older, fall in Park City holds the same special feeling. And best of all, the summer crowds have gone back to work and school, and the winter ski crowds haven’t yet arrived. It’s a chance for local restauranteurs to catch their breath, take some time off, and enjoy the city without having the accelerator pedal jammed all of the way to the floor.

For locals on the Wasatch Front, the shoulder seasons are a great opportunity to find hotels at a great discount (some priced 25-50% lower than their winter rates). Many restaurants also offer locals deals during this time in order to keep their tables full. Tupelo, for example, offers a five course tasting menu for a bargain price of $49. Optional wine pairing is an additional $25. You don’t see that kind of deal during the ski season.

On a recent weekend, we stayed a couple days at the Stein Eriksen Lodge in Deer Valley. This hotel is ideally located at the base of the Silver Lake and Sterling Express lifts, providing easy access for those adventure seekers who aren’t too interested in riding bikes or hiking uphill. Not interested in taking a lift? No problem. There is easy access to dozens of public hiking/biking trails that will take you all over the mountains if you wish. One of my personal favorites is the Mid Mountain trail, which will take you all the way over to the Canyons resort if you are looking for a big adventure. Being on the trails in the fall with the leaves changing colors is really something special, and one of the reasons I love Utah so much.

Of course, one of the reasons it’s called the “mud season” is that you have to be prepared for all types of weather. It is Utah in the mountains, after all. Our hiking and biking plans were quickly derailed when the mountain received about eight inches of snow during our weekend stay. No problem–we fired up the in-room fireplace, headed off to the hot tub, took a dip in the pool, and relaxed in the room.

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Then off to Sunday brunch at the Glitretind we went, which was absolutely phenomenal. Fellow diners and our servers were so good to our little baby, and the buffet offers something for everyone. Seafood, salads, chicken, prime rib, crèpes, waffles, eggs benedict–you name it, and it was probably there. And their dessert table is ridiculous, and featured an aspen tree centerpiece made out of chocolate.

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For dinner, we hopped down off the mountain and headed into a small strip mall next to The Market at Park City. I was thrilled to discover that one of my favorite Mexican restaurants, Tarahumara, has opened a second location in Park City. The original Tarahumara in Midway is always packed, but I think that the Park City Tarahumara may still be a hidden gem, because it was not very busy. The carne asada, carnitas, and enchiladas were all excellent. And of course they have their famous salsa bar with what must be 30+ different delicious salsas.

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So if you’re crunched on time, budget, or just want a quick getaway, I’d suggest taking a look at a Park City/Deer Valley vacation. You can enjoy Main Street without the crowds, fill your belly with delicious food at a reasonable price, and perhaps upgrade your hotel accommodations from what you normally budget for. It’s a delicious and affordable getaway.

I was an invited guest of Stein Eriksen Lodge and the Glitretind restaurant. Opinions are my own.

Alamexo Cantina

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During his travels throughout Mexico, Matt Lake, chef/owner of Alamexo Kitchen downtown, was always struck by a certain type of restaurant. The cantinas he encountered are vibrant, lively, and most importantly, promote a sense of community and togetherness. Families, friends, strangers gather around tables sharing various dishes and libations, telling stories and laughing together.

These memories drove Matt’s vision as he put together his newest project: Alamexo Cantina, which opened this week in the 9th and 9th neighborhood. The style of service is different than at Alamexo downtown. The cantina cuisine is reminiscent of a street market in Mexico, but in a sit-down situation.

“Everything will come family style, everyone orders and you have it all at once, mixing and matching. I don’t want to take ourselves too seriously. But I do want it to be fun. It needs to be super easy and fun,” says Lake. “The best way to get at this concept is that I wish I could pick what people eat but I can’t. I felt this was the closest way to get to that experience of just letting the chef guide your dining experience. Whatever time [of the day] you come it’s the same [price]. One menu, all day long, with a wide array of shared dishes.”

The space itself is striking, with bright, vibrant colors contrasting with the dark tables and ceiling. A large glossy Adam Finkle photograph adorns the back wall, showcasing the multitude of ingredients involved in making a molé. The centerpiece of the bar area is a large mural by local artist Harry Baldwin, and depicts the iconic Espolón Blanco label. There is a gorgeous candle wall that is interesting during the bright daytime hours, but turns into something living, breathing, and very special at night. My favorite part is that most of the front wall separating the dining room from the patio breaks down, opening up completely and blurring the line between inside and out. This will be the spot to be on a warm evening. The kitchen itself is small, and is limited to a long comal (flat top griddle) and two fryers for chips. That’s it.

“We’re limited in the kitchen. But with that limitation comes clarity,” says Lake.

For those of you who haven’t been to Alamexo downtown, or his previous project, ZY, I highly suggest you try Chef Lake’s creations out. He is, in my opinion, one of the most talented chefs in the city. He won Food & Wine’s Best New Chef award in 1996 and worked at New Heights in Washington D.C. and Rosa Mexicano in New York City, one of the city’s first and foremost upscale Mexican restaurants. He graduated at the top of the class while attending the prestigious Culinary Institute of America. He, along with his team, make everything from scratch, from roasting whole chickens to making the various molé sauces.

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Chef Lake
So be sure to stop by, grab some guacamole and a drink at the bar, or dive right in to some dishes to share with some friends.

Alamexo Cantina
1059 East 900 S
Salt Lake City
(801) 658-5859

Reservations not accepted

http://www.alamexo.com/cantina

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Addendum: Johnny Slice

I’m going to keep this one brief, but I felt it merited a follow-up.

Back a few years ago (ok, maybe quite a few more than that), I was a mediocre little league basketball player. The only hot streak I ever had was the record number of consecutive games in which I would warm the bench. Of course, at the end of season awards ceremony, I was always the proud recipient of the “most improved player” award, even though technically I probably didn’t improve and even more technically it was a stretch to even classify me as a player. But they needed to award me something, and most improved was all they had left at the bottom of the trophy pile.

Anywho.

I wanted to post an addendum to my previous review of Johnny Slice and award their pizza the SLCeats Most Improved Player award. Except unlike my little league awards, this one is actually merited. It pained me in my initial review to praise the pizza place for everything except, well, the pizza. Truth be told, it wasn’t that great and I wasn’t a very big fan. But to their credit, it appears that ownership listened and made the necessary course corrections, because in the numerous times I’ve been since, their pizza has improved remarkably and is now among my favorite slices in SLC. The buffalo chicken pizza, laced with bleu cheese, is my new favorite.

Anyways, that’s it. Credit where credit is due. Johnny Slice is making some mean pizza now. Go and enjoy.

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Howdy Homemade Ice Cream

 

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Photo courtesy Howdy Homemade Ice Cream

“Come for the ice cream, but stay for the people” is a common saying of Tom Landis, founder of Howdy Homemade Ice Cream. This Dallas-based ice cream concept touts ice cream made in-house using high quality ingredients that yield unique results, such as the Dr. Pepper chocolate chip ice cream, a favorite in Dr. Pepper-obsessed Texas.

Oh, and the other unique aspect of Howdy? The majority of their employees have special needs related to Down Syndrome or autism.

“Our main goal and hope is that people recognize exactly what our employees can do instead of what they can’t do,” Will Nielson, son of the Howdy Salt Lake store said in a recent interview with the Deseret News. “I think when a disability or a special need comes up, often our mind starts running on to what are the limitations or the disabilities instead of thinking about (how) someone with autism, they have great retention skills, and someone with Down syndrome, they’re just naturally the most happy and loving people that you come across.”

Howdy Salt Lake is located at 2670 South 2000 East, across the street from Feldman’s Deli.  Local contractor Chris Nielson, who has a son with special needs, fell in love with the Howdy concept and brought it to Utah. The store features some local flair, offering sorbettos made by Amour Cafe, as well as a Publik coffee chocolate chip. All of the other ice creams are made in-house and feature everything from your basic cookies and cream all the way to a Dr. Pepper chocolate chip.

I particularly enjoyed the cheesecake ice cream, which is everything you’d hope it would be: rich and creamy. If you’re a fan of Coldstone’s sweet cream ice cream, this is the one for you. The Dr. Pepper ice cream was unique, but I was left wishing that a bit more of the soda flavor would have shone through. But it is a fun idea, and definitely worth at least sampling. Other favorites were the cinnamon brown sugar and the orange dream.

I love everything about the concept, from the location, the smart design, the delicious ice cream, the prices, and most of all, the wonderful smiles from everybody behind the counter. It is heartwarming to see the community coming out to support the shop, as evidenced by lines out the door when we stopped by.

Howdy Salt Lake
2670 S 2000 East, Salt Lake City

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Regent Street Beat

Regent Street continues to slowly build out as broadway shows fill the Eccles Theater. Two items to mention: Pretty Bird, Viet Pham’s new spot which will serve Nashville Hot Chicken, is scheduled to open in October, according to Pham. Although I would serve that hot chicken with a side of healthy skepticism, since a recent snoop inside indicates little to no construction activity inside.

Second shop is the Last Course ice cream dessert studio. Construction has started, and I was unable to sleuth out any additional information online regarding this spot, so keep your eyes peeled for additional information later on.

Eat Local Week 9/9-9/16

From September 9th through 16th Eat Local Week Utah, a community-wide celebration of the harvest and those who labor to produce it, is scheduled. Eat Local Week promotes local agriculture and the preservation of Utah’s agricultural heritage, and brings people together around the food they eat. Through a series of activities and events around the state, Eat Local Week seeks to educate people about resources for eating locally, and increase awareness about food production, transportation and access to healthy food for all Utahns.

This year, Eat Local Week has expanded to include opportunities across the state. For example, over 10 restaurants in Moab are offering menu items with at least three local items. A documentary film, Food Chains, which tells the story of farm labor in the United States and advocated for the dignified life for farm workers and creating a more humane, transparent food system, will be screened in English and Spanish in Salt Lake. In Kaysville, farm-to-table dinners provide a unique option to experience food at the height of the harvest season.

The Liberty Park Farmers Market will launch their Double Up Food Bucks, a three-year old nutrition incentive program that helps low-income families take home affordable fresh fruits and vegetables grown by local farmers, joining the Downtown Farmers Market and farm stands across the state who have participated for three years. Both the Downtown Farmers Market and Liberty Park Farmers Market will feature events and promotions surrounding local food. Events are listed below and at:

http://www.eatlocalweek.org

https://www.facebook.com/eatlocalweekutah

“Eat Local Week” is my favorite week of the year, because it really does challenge us to learn more about where our food comes from, and how much we grow and produce right here in our own state,” says Alison Einerson, Downtown Farmers Market manager.  “From local meats to produce to dairy and cheeses, you can find virtually everything you want to eat made right here in Utah. Food is truly a resource that binds us all, and connects our state rural and urban communities.”

A cornerstone of Eat Local Week is the “Eat Local Challenge,” which challenges people to eat and drink food that is grown or produced within a 250 mile radius of their home for one week. Now in its 10th year, the Eat Local Challenge is an opportunity for Utahns to garner a closer connection to food sources. eatlocalweek.org contains several resources to where to shop for local food, as well as recipe ideas.

Utahns are encouraged to craft the challenge level of their choice: a strict option—no coffee, no chocolate, no olive oil, is one example. Alternatively, participants can choose specific food groups that are easy to obtain locally (produce, meats, dairy) and stay truly local to them for a week. Spice Kitchen will offer locally sourced pre-made meals during Eat Local Week. Spice Kitchen Incubator is a project of the International Rescue Committee IRC) in partnership with Salt Lake County.

The goal of the challenge is to engage people to discover how much food we grow and produce in our region, and to show how changing small daily habits can have a profound effect on our health, our economy, and our diet. The Eat Local Challenge is a unique opportunity to learn more about local food and to foster creativity around what and how we feed ourselves, at the height of the harvest season.

Eat Local Week events include the following:

Saturday, September 9th

Taste of the Market & Perfectly Wild Produce Contest

Downtown Farmers Market, 8 am-2 pm

Saturday, September 9th

Wasatch Community Gardens Annual Tomato Sandwich Party

Grateful Tomato Garden, 11 am-2 pm

Saturday, September 9th

Taste of Harmons Rooftop Party

Harmons City Creek, 6-10 pm

Monday, September 11th

Free “Food Chains” Film Screening. Proceeds benefit Comunidades Unidas.

Pre-Party at 6 pm (Pago), Screening at 7 pm (Tower Theater)

Tuesday, September 12th

Quickle (Quick Pickle) at the Tuesday Farmers Market

Pioneer Park, 4 pm

Tuesday, September 12th

Starting and Maintaining a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Enterprise

Youth Garden Project, Moab, 1-5 pm

Wednesday, September 13th

Free “Food Chains” Film Screening in Spanish, followed by panel discussion with Jorge Fierro of Rico Brand

Sorenson Unity Center, 855 W California Ave, 7-9 pm

Wednesday, September 13th

Taste of the Sugar House Farmers Market

Fairmont Park, 5 pm

Thursday, September 14th

Farm to Table Dinner

USU Botanical Center, Kaysville, 6-7 pm

Friday, September 15th

Taste of the Liberty Park Farmers Market

Liberty Park, 4 pm

Saturday, September 16th

Fermentation Festival at the Downtown Farmers Market sponsored by Catalyst Magazine

Pioneer Park, 9 am-1pm

2017 Downtown Dine O’Round

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The 2017 edition of the Downtown Dine O’Round kicks off September 15th and runs through October 1st. During the Dine O’Round, over 45 downtown restaurants offer various dining specials. Participating restaurants will offer either a $5 or $10 fixed price lunch, and $15, $25, and $35 three-course dinners.

The Dine O’Round is an excellent way to try out some restaurants that perhaps aren’t in your normal rotation. New additions this year include HSL, Rib and Chop House, Fat Jack’s, and White Horse. I’m particularly interested in what White Horse’s $10 lunch will include, as I’ve been meaning to try that place.

You can find more information, check out some menus from last year, and make reservations at the Dine O’Round website.

WINE DINNER SEPTEMBER 13 AT STANZA ITALIAN BISTRO & WINE BAR

Stanza Italian Bistro & Wine Bar welcomes William Davis with Wilson Daniels Wines as he presents his portfolio of paired wines with Chef Jonathan LeBlanc’s five-course tasting menu on Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. Cost is just $100 per person (or $60 per person without wine pairings). Reservations are a must and can be made by calling 801-746-4441. Reservations may be made on www.stanzaslc.com but a notation about the wine dinner needs to be included.

The pairing of Wilson Daniels wines and Stanza’s menu include: Bisol ‘Crede’ Prosecco upon arrival; Course One of Garnet Yam Gnocchi with Castello DI Volpaia Chianti Classico riserva DOCG; Course Two of Brazino paired with Arnaldo‐Caprai Montefalco Rosso DOC; a palate cleanser course of Pink Grapefruit Sorbet; Course Four of Maiale Da Latte (braised pork belly) with Tenuta Sette Cieli ‘Indaco’: and  a final course of Forelle Pear with Bisol ‘Crede’ Prosecco cocktail.

“Wilson Daniels carries some amazing Italian wines. I’m pairing a special tasting menu based on what’s coming off the farms,” says Executive Chef Jonathan LeBlanc. “I’m loving the flavor combinations and look forward to sharing them with our guests.”

Founded in 1978, Wilson Daniels is a fully integrated, family-owned marketing and sales company representing a highly selective portfolio of the world’s most distinctive wines and spirits. Wilson Daniels continues to pursue and elevate the standards of excellence set by founders Win Wilson and Jack Daniels through developing long-term, strategic partnerships with luxury producers that possess profound respect for terroir, and are benchmarks in their region.

Stanza is located at 454 East, 300 South in Salt Lake. Reservations can be made by calling 801-746-4441, info@stanzaslc.com or by visiting www.stanzaslc.com.

 

Dave and Busters Coming to Gateway

In another step toward re-establishing itself as the heart of downtown Salt Lake City, The Gateway has announced that they have reached an agreement with entertainment and dining chain, Dave & Buster’s, to open its first Utah location on the property.
In addition to its $100 million redevelopment plan, The Gateway and its parent company, Vestar, have been looking for a big name, family-friendly venue to anchor its rebranding effort.

“This is a huge win for us,” said Edie Trott, marketing director at The Gateway. “We like to offer our visitors something exclusive and unique, and Dave & Buster’s is the perfect one-of-a-kind dining and entertainment experience that we think people can get excited about.”

“Vestar has a long, fortunate history of working with Dave & Buster’s throughout our portfolio,” said Jenny Cushing, Vice President of Leasing at Vestar. “They’re synonymous with the kind of entertainment we’re dedicated to bringing to The Gateway. This latest announcement is just the start of a series of new developments that we’re excited to share with all of Salt Lake City.”

With restaurants in 34 states, and internationally, Dave & Buster’s has found success with a unique combination of entertainment and dining, offering its customers the opportunity to “eat, drink, play and watch,” all in one location.

“We take a great deal of care with how we grow our business—and coming into the Salt Lake market appealed to us for a number of reasons,” said John Mulleady, Senior Vice President of Development. “The Gateway provided us with the perfect opportunity to introduce Utah families to our brand of entertainment and dining. With something to offer everyone—at any age—we think this brings something special to the community.”