Emigration Cafe’s New Brunch Menu

From our friends at Emigration Cafe:

NEW BRUNCH MENU ALERT! 
Every Saturday & Sunday 10am-2pm

BRUNCH MENU 
SHARE PLATES

Green Garbanzo Hummus Ⓥ – cherry tomatoes, sweet herbs, sumac, warm pita

 Parmesan Flatbread Ⓥ – pinza dough, parmesan, olive oil                                 

3 Cheese Artichoke Dip Ⓥ – parmesan flatbread, pickled chile
Smoked Salmon Toast – Sourdough, goat cheese, capers, red onion, preserved lemon salad                   

SOUP & SALAD

Lemon Rice Soup ⓋGF – Lemon, Arborio rice, vegetable broth
Soup of the day
House Salad Ⓥ – pecans, pickled grapes, onion, honey cider vin, goat cheese crostini
Classic Caesar Ⓥ – romaine, house croutons, parmesan, lemon, house dressing
Classic Greek Ⓥ – tomato, cucumber, onion, feta, Kalamata, romaine, croutons
Arugula & Fennel Ⓥ GF – chevre, cherry bourbon vinaigrette, slivered almond
Butter Lettuce – miso buttermilk dressing, smoked blue cheese, bacon, everything bagel crumble, tomato

SANDWICHES

Grilled Cheese with Brie and Havarti Ⓥ – brie, Havarti cheese, apple, onion jam, sourdough
BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich-  miso buttermilk slaw, fried onions, ciabatta
Emigration Burger*– 6oz grilled patty, American cheese, grilled onions, garlic aioli, half dill pickles, lettuce
Smoked Turkey Club* – millionaire bacon, avocado spread, lettuce, aioli, ciabatta, onion
Grilled Trout Tartine* – open faced, cabbage slaw, remoulade, ciabatta
BLT– bacon, tomato, aioli, lettuce, spicy carrot slaw, sourdough

MAINS
Avocado Toast Ⓥ – avocado, radish, everything bagel spice, breakfast potatoes
Overnight Oats Ⓥ – brown sugar, banana, pecans, seasonal berries
French Toast Casserole –  house-made challah French toast, miso caramel sauce, fresh peaches, candied pecans, whipped cream
Egg Sandwich –bacon or avocado, American cheese, aioli, fried egg, brioche, potatoes
Chicken & Biscuit – fried chicken, saw-mill gravy, chili-honey glaze, pickled chilis, sunny up egg
Breakfast Burrito – scrambled eggs, queso sauce, bacon, heirloom beans, potatoes, aioli
Vegan Burrito Ⓥ– broken tofu, queso sauce, potatoes, tomatillo salsa, beans
Shrimp & Grits – cheddar grits, Tasso ham, summer squash, cherry tomato, white wine cream
Basic Breakfast GF– choice of eggs, potatoes millionaire bacon or seasonal vegetables

Emigration Cafe | 1709 E. 1300 S. | SLC
Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner – Monday – Saturday
Saturday & Sunday Brunch – 10am-3pm
Online ordering now available, order here
Reservations now available for all party sizes. Book your table here
801-906-8101

Park City Restaurants Announce Fall Hours

From the Park City Area Restaurant Association:

Autumn has arrived, and Park City Area Restaurant Association (PCARA) members are shifting gears – and hours – to accommodate guests through shoulder season and prepare for what will be a lively, bustling winter to come.    

“Some restaurants will scale back to gear up for a busy winter ahead, while others will continue with their regular hours through shoulder season to serve our loyal locals and fall visitors,” Park City Area Restaurant Association Executive Director Ginger Wicks said. “Autumn harvest brings such an abundance of locally-sourced ingredients, and we encourage patrons to support our restaurant community by trying out limited-time seasonal menus along with beloved signature dishes.”  

For the most up-to-date information on shoulder season hours, visit parkcityrestaurants.com. Currently, PCARA member fall hours are as follows:

350 Main

Open Wednesday – Saturday, 5 p.m. – Close

Closed Thanksgiving

Alpine Distilling

Closed Saturday, Oct. 8 – Saturday, Oct. 15 

Big Dipper

Open Monday – Wednesday, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., and Thursday – Sunday, 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Closed Thanksgiving

The Brass Tag

Closing Oct. 16 – Dec. 2, reopening Saturday, Dec. 3

Courchevel Bistro

Stop in for Happy Hour Wednesdays – Sundays from 5 – 6 p.m. through Saturday, Nov. 5 for 20% off select appetizers and desserts. 

Closing Sunday, Nov. 6 – Tuesday, Dec. 6

Deer Valley Grocery~Café

Closing Oct. 24 – Nov. 15, reopening Wednesday, Nov. 16

Escala Provisions Restaurant & Bar

Open 7 a.m. – 9 p.m. daily

Grub Steak Restaurant

Open nightly, 5 – 9 p.m.

Hearth and Hill

Open Monday – Saturday, 11:30 a.m. – 9 p.m., and Sunday, 10 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Hill’s Kitchen

Open 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. daily 

High West Distillery

Saloon (Historic Park City): Closing Sunday, Nov. 13 – Sunday, Nov. 30

Refectory (Wanship): Closing Monday, Nov. 14 – Friday, Dec. 2

Nelson Cottage (Historic Park City): Saturday, Oct. 29 – Friday, Dec. 16

Riverhorse on Main

Open Sunday – Thursday, 5 – 9 p.m., Friday – Saturday, 5 – 9:30 p.m.

Closing Sunday, Nov. 6 – Thursday, Nov. 10

Closed Thanksgiving

Roadhouse Grill & Pub – Park City

Open Sunday – Sunday

8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Salt Box Eatery & Catering

Open Monday – Sunday, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. 

Grab and go, family meal pick up and catering pick up available until 5 p.m.

Shabu

Open nightly, 5 p.m. – Close 

The Spur Bar & Grill

Open daily, 11 a.m. – 1 a.m. featuring live music every night

Closed Thanksgiving

The Star Bar

Open Wednesday – Saturday, 5 p.m. – Close

Closed Thanksgiving

Stein Collection

Enjoy a staycation at Stein Eriksen Lodge, Stein Eriksen Residences, or The Chateaux Deer Valley with the Taste of Fall package. Enjoy overnight accommodations including a 3-course dinner for two at The Glitretind (served in Troll Hallen Lounge) or Sunday Brunch. 

Troll Hallen Lounge (Stein Eriksen Lodge)

Open 7 a.m. – Midnight daily

Champions Club (Stein Eriksen Lodge)

Closing Monday, Oct. 10 – Tuesday, Nov. 22

First Tracks Kaffe (Stein Eriksen Lodge)

Closing Monday, Oct. 10 – Tuesday, Nov. 22

Cena Ristorante & Lounge (The Chateaux)

Closing Monday, Oct. 31 – Tuesday, Nov. 22

The 7-8-8-0 Club (Stein Eriksen Residences)

Closing Monday, Oct. 31 – Tuesday, Nov. 22

Sterling Steak and Lounge

Free Pumpkin Carving October 21st  – 6 p.m.

Tupelo

Closed Mondays and Tuesdays until mid-December and closed Sundays until next spring

Versante Hearth + Bar

Open 4 – 9 p.m. nightly

Wild Ember

Closed until Wednesday, Dec. 14

For more information about restaurants’ fall hours or the PCARA, visit www.parkcityrestaurants.com or contact Christa Graff, of Graff Public Relations, at christa@graffpr.com or 435-640-7921.

Deer Valley Dinner with Chef Massimo Bottura

Experience a one-of-a-kind culinary event with Chef Massimo Bottura the evenings of December 16, 17 and 18, 2022, in the world-class resort’s Fireside Dining at Empire Canyon Lodge. Taste the Difference during an intimate evening with Chef Massimo and Deer Valley’s renowned culinary team while enjoying featured wines from Daou Vineyards and Dalla Terra and a luxury gift from KJUS Ski/Golf wear. 

Choose from two different experiences with this 3-star Michelin chef.

VIP MEET & GREET RECEPTION WITH CHEF MASSIMO BOTTURA
An exclusive VIP meet-and-greet reception and personal cookbook signing with Chef Massimo, as well as an Italian dinner, consisting of a multiple course tasting menu with wine pairings, full bar service, and live jazz music.
CHEF MASSIMO BOTTURA MICHELIN STAR
ITALIAN DINNER
Hear remarks from Chef Massimo, as well as Deer Valley’s culinary and beverage teams before savoring six unforgettable courses including Italian wine pairings and live jazz music.

You can book your spot on Deer Valley’s website.

Pat’s BBQ

I’m not usually one to rag on local restaurants. I like to think of myself as more of a hype man regarding SLC’s dining scene than anything else. I truly feel that anyone that’s willing to stick their neck out and run a restaurant deserves our applause and support. Generally speaking, if a restaurant is out there trying their best, I tend to give them the benefit of the doubt when things fall short.

However, there’s a point in which certain restaurants don’t even try anymore, and when they get to that point, they deserve to be called out. I feel it’s disrespectful to customers when the service and the food is so egregiously bad that it’s obvious the restaurant has given up on having any sort of standards.

Sadly, such is the case with Pat’s BBQ. I don’t know what happened to Pat’s over the past little while, but whatever it is, it hasn’t been for the better. I will say I noticed a similar pattern with another once-great BBQ restaurant: R&R BBQ. Both have seemed to followed the same path: original owner/pitmaster sells out, transitions away from the business, and the quality control falls apart.

At the Commonwealth location off 21st South, it’s a full-service restaurant, unlike their State St location, which is quick-serve style. I feel the quick-serve setup is better for most BBQ restaurants, and given that 90% of the BBQ restaurants I’ve been to over the years is the “order at the counter and sit down” style, I think it’s evident that that’s the way to go.

Walking into Pat’s was a sleepy affair, with us waiting several minutes be be acknowledged by the lone server working that day. The first red flag was that the place smelled absolutely nothing like a BBQ place. I want to walk in and smell like there’s a raging campfire in the room next door (or at least somewhere in the vicinity.) Staged or not, I want some smell of burning wood to tell me there’s some serious smoking work going on behind the scenes. Pat’s smelled more like a Costco or a library than a BBQ restaurant.

Once seated, no drink order was taken, and what seemed like ten minutes passed before our food order was taken. It was not busy.

And then the food arrived. First, the positives: the french fries were very good. Breaded, crispy, and warm. Same goes for the baked beans, which were rich and flavorful. And then there was the brisket, which was a room-temperature nightmare, and the slices had some obvious oxidation that told me these slices had been sitting out for a while. The room-temperature meat made me nervous. A comment was made to the server about this, and the reply was “I’ll let her know” (assuming the “her” was the cook). No efforts were made to rectify the situation by either replacing the meat with another option, or taking it off the bill. If I’m running a restaurant and a customer tells me something’s not up to snuff, they’re going to get more than just an “I’m sorry.” “I’m sorry” doesn’t fix the problem. It just makes the server feel better while leaving the diner with a bad experience.

For the cornbread, I might as well have eaten drywall spackle. It would have been more moist and would have had more flavor than what we were given. And maybe the drywall would have come with a side of butter, which is more than the cornbread came with.

My kid had the mac and cheese, which looked sadder than the empty band stage behind us. He didn’t even touch it. It was barely warm, with terrible presentation, and lacking in flavor. For my four-year-old to not completely house a cup of mac-and-cheese told me everything I needed to know about it.

If a shoulder shrug and an eye roll could be personified in food and service format, it was perfected in this meal at Pat’s.

Enjoy the $25, Pat’s. It’s going to be the last money you ever see from me.

Marc Marrone’s Italian Graffiti Coming to The Gateway

Italian Graffiti is the first full-scale restaurant by Nice Hospitality, the visionary team behind HallPass and SkinnyFATS. This new venture will offer a contemporary interpretation of classic Italian fare and hand-crafted family recipes from Chef-Partner Marc Marrone’s Italian-influenced upbringing in New York City. Building upon nearly 20 years of experience earned at world-class restaurants across the country, Chef Marc brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to Nice Hospitality’s newest venture. Guests can expect to be immersed in the art of vibe dining with Italian Graffiti’s expansive wine menu, open format cooking, daily house made pasta, a full bakery, and dry aged meat program. The area’s first modern osteria will feature floral-inspired decor with one-of-a-kind art installations throughout the dining room, bar, and lounge areas.

“With grandparents who immigrated from Italy, my most cherished family traditions centered around sharing homemade meals together. I want our guests to experience that same gracious hospitality and convivial atmosphere,” says Marc Marrone. “The popularity of HallPass at The Gateway paved the way for this new concept as we feel it has increasingly become a coveted dining and entertainment destination in Salt Lake City.”

Italian Graffiti is slated to open this summer at the southeast corner of The Gateway.

Park City’s “Savor the Summit” Returns

After a two-year hiatus, the Park City Area Restaurant Association’s (PCARA) annual Savor the Summit will return to Historic Main Street on June 25, 2022.  

“We could not be more excited to bring Savor the Summit to life this year, and we are so grateful for the collaborative efforts of the City, Historic Park City Alliance (HPCA) and our loyal patrons who have been patiently awaiting the event’s return,” said PCARA Executive Director Ginger Wicks. “Guests can look forward to a completely revamped, refreshed version of our favorite summer dining tradition.”  

This year’s participating PCARA-member restaurants will celebrate the official kickoff to summer by offering their own inspired menus for guests to enjoy. The full lineup of partners and reservations for a seat at the Grande Table will be available soon. To save yours, as well as stay up to date on ongoing event updates, visit www.savorthesummit.com

Wildwood

Wildwood Restaurant sits nestled amongst historic homes on 3rd Avenue in the city’s Avenues neighborhood, and is located in the former Avenues Bistro location.

“American Comfort Food” is the name of the game here. Their website describes themselves as a “product driven restaurant which features an evolving and continuously changing menu with craft cocktails, beer, and wine.”

It’s no surprise the menu is approachable yet innovative, given that Wildwood is owned by Chef Michael Richey. Richey is a mainstay of the Salt Lake culinary scene, having opened Pago and working previously as the chef at Solitude as well as Grand Targhee Resort. Those familiar with Pago’s culinary approach will feel right at home at Wildwood.

The menu is innovative yet not intimidating. Diners will spot recognizable offerings such as shishitos, salmon pillows, croquettes, chicken wings, fish and chips, and fried chicken. But each of these dishes buck tradition in their own unique (and good) way.

For example, the chicken wings were cooked to a perfect crisp. That much is to be expected from any competent kitchen. But the spicy sambal sauce that the wings were doused in added a unique, spicy tangent that presented wings in an entirely different light and paired with the blue cheese dip made an irresistible combination. I couldn’t stop eating them. I will admit that I wasn’t sure at the time (and I’m still not sure now) if the bright orange oil that covered the plate was a feature or a bug of the dish. But that question certainly didn’t slow me down.

The braised pork dish had some familiar aspects, featuring crispy pork belly and tender short ribs, accompanied by shishitos, some greens, and a deliciously light and tart cara cara orange and pear gastrique. The citrus was a perfect foil for the rich and fatty pork.

The “Desert Mountain Burger” features caramelized onions, Beehive Cheese cheddar, bourbon bacon, and an aioli. The burger was really nice, and pretty much what you’d expect from a restaurant of this caliber. Although I must admit I continue to hold out hope that the fancy burger trend will shift away from these giant, gloppy, unmanageable creations, and shift back to something that I’m able to eat at my leisure without having to wolf it down before either a) the bun disintegrates and it turns into a big, sloppy mess or b) everything slides off the burger because there’s simply too much “stuff” on it. I’m of the opinion that burgers shouldn’t be taller than what I can fit in my mouth. Make Burgers Approachable Again.

Other items such as the mushroom risotto, cast iron bavette, and roasted steelhead trout left me anxious to stop by again to try them out. With their quickly-rotating menu, I hope that I’ll be able to catch them before they’re gone, although I’m sure that when they are replaced, they’ll be replaced with items that are equally delicious.

The layout of the restaurant is, shall we say, unique. Which shouldn’t come as a surprise to those familiar with the eclectic architectural designs of Avenues residences and businesses. Our reservation was at 6, and so the dinner service was just getting into full swing, with the main-level dining room completely packed.

The hostess beckoned us to follow her, and indeed we did, past all of the diners, past the galley-style kitchen, being careful to avoid the dish rinsing station, kitchen racks, and other various “back of the house” objects. We made it past the kitchen, to the back of the building, and then down a narrow staircase into what can best be described as a downstairs bar/speakeasy. The speakeasy was plenty dark, and we were the only ones down there. The tables were rounded glass perched atop High West whiskey barrels, so leg-stretching was not an option. The chairs were backless mid-height barstools.

On one hand, it was a cool, unique experience. On the other had, it was somewhat uncomfortable, and lacked the typical conviviality that is usually experienced in a busy, bustling restaurant. I felt like we were sitting at the otherwise empty kids’ table at Aunt Mildred’s house.

But the awkwardness abated after a half hour or so, as other diners found themselves seated in our intimate dining dungeon. It was actually sort of fun as we laughed about the situation and found some humor in all of it.

The separation also made me wonder if the attentiveness of service would suffer as a result of our being cast into outer darkness. But those concerns were unfounded as our server was extremely attentive and did everything he could to make sure we had a special experience at Wildwood.

My advice is as follows: if you want a busy, loud dining experience with a bunch of hub-bub, ask to be seated in the main dining room. If you’re looking for something more intimate and secluded, and are fine sitting on stools and dining on whiskey barrels, then by all means ask for downstairs. It was a fun experience. My suggestion to WildWood would be that if you’re going to seat someone down there, make sure you ask them ahead of time when they make the reservation, if it’s ok. Explain the situation. Don’t put your diners in the uncomfortable situation of either requesting a seating change and disrupting the dining plans for the evening, or just dealing with the surprise of the seating situation.

Either way, no matter what you decide, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed with the food, or the experience. As an Avenues resident, I’m glad that we have these small neighborhood spots to enjoy, and hope that Wildwood will be around for many years to come.

Wildwood is currently open Wednesday through Sunday for dinner service only, from 5pm to close.

WildWood
564 E 3rd Ave
Salt Lake City
(801) 831-5409

Ellerbeck Walk-Up Café

For those familiar with the Avenues neighborhood, you’re well aware of the beautiful pioneer-era Victorian at the corner of 3rd and B Street. The mansion now holds a bed and breakfast and was purchased two years ago by Tyler and Kara, who have been making serious efforts to rejuvenate this Avenues jewel.

Recently Tyler and Kara have added their new secret weapon to their B&B—Victoriya, who is the Ellerbeck Innkeeper. Together, they’ve launched a new project at Ellerbeck—a walk-up café to serve all of your caffeinated and caloric needs.

The concept fits in perfectly with the general vibe of the Aves, which is known for its walkability and easy access to just about everything.

I stopped by to have a taste of their offerings. The hot chocolate (made with steamed milk, of course) was rich and delicious. I also tried their “Johnnycake” slathered with “Beehive Butter,” which is essentially what you would get if you crossed cornbread with cake. Lighter than cornbread, but still with the delicious, crunchy top that I love so much.

I’m excited to stop by again soon to try out their “cottage cakes,” with strawberries and cream. Cottage cakes are fluffy pancakes made with cottage cheese to give it body. Sounds pretty great to me.

The walk-up is open 8am-2pm Thursday through Sunday, and features a rotation of pioneer-inspired breakfast items.

140 B Street, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Fenice Mediterranean Bistro

Right before the pandemic began, Jeff and Lisa Ward (owners of Silverstar Café in Park City signed a lease on the small restaurant space formerly occupied by Fireside on Regent, just next to the Eccles Theater and a stone’s throw from Prettybird Salt Lake.

To be honest, I can’t even imagine what it must have been like to even think about opening a restaurant right as talk of remote work and quarantining started to infiltrate our daily conversations. But for the Wards, it gave them a bit of a breather; a chance to reset and really think things through and consider how (and what) they wanted their first venture into Salt Lake dining to be.

Ant their thoughtful approach shows in every detail at Fenice Mediterranean Bistro (126 S Regent Street). The layout and design of the space keeps things intimate and warm (no doubt helped by the piping hot pizza oven located in the corner of the open kitchen). I was invited by the restaurant to stop by and check out some dishes.

The menu reflect the Mediterranean vibes well, with various small plates such as roasted olives with burrata, polenta with balsamic-roasted potatoes (really tasty), and patatas bravos.

For pasta, I tried the bolognese bianca, which was absolutely rich, creamy, and delicious. Exactly what you would expect from a well-executed bolognese. Other dishes that caught my eye that I didn’t get a chance to try were the mushroom risotto, the osso bucco, whole roasted branzino, and a New York steak au poivre. Inquiries to other diners who had those dishes were met with strong, favorable reviews. The pizzas also looked delicious.

Prices are reasonable considering the level of execution of the dishes as well as the downtown location, with the mains ranging from around $25-$30, pizzas $18, and pasta dishes $17-$22.

For the adult beverage side of things, I will as always graciously bow out of offering any opinions other than saying that the restaurant features a full cocktail menu and what appears to me to be a quite substantial selection of wines and beers. I will note that due to their current liquor license, you must be 21 or older to dine at Fenice.

The restaurant is currently open for dinnerTuesday through Saturday from 5pm-9:30pm, and their websites states they are closed Mondays and Tuesdays. No mention of Sundays so be sure to check with them prior to hoofing it down there. Dinner only for now, but they anticipate they will expand into brunch and lunch soon.

Patatas Bravas
Bolognese

Park City Plated

The Park City Area Restaurant Association (PCARA) introduces its newest initiative, Park City Plated. Beginning in August, the program will feature a different Park City restaurant each month, offering special menu items to welcome new and returning guests to try their innovative menu creations.

“Park City Plated is a brand new way for guests to sample our community’s diverse dining scene,” said PCARA executive director Ginger Wicks. “Exclusive monthly specials from a rotating collection of some of Park City’s finest restaurants give guests the opportunity to experience new, local flavors and unique menu items all year long.”

The following PCARA member restaurants participating so far are as follows:

August 25th: Hearth and Hill

September19th: Riverhorse on Main

October18th: Stein Eriksen Lodge

November 7th: Escala Provisions Company Restaurant

November 13th: Powder at Waldorf Astoria

 

December (Dates TBD): Red Rock Brewery and High West Distillery

January (Date TBD): Deer Valley Grocery~Café

February (Date TBD): tupelo

March (Date TBD): The Brass Tag

April (Date TBD): Riverhorse Provisions

 

More restaurants and their Park City Plated menu offerings will be confirmed soon.